Relationship between the affective behavioral and cognitive components of attitude

relationship between the affective behavioral and cognitive components of attitude

Ostrom, T. M. (). The relationship between the affective, behavioral, and cognitive components of attitude. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 5(1 ). It has long been assumed that attitudes have affective, behavioral, and cognitive components. Two hypotheses were derived from this assumption and tested in. The Relationship between the Affective, Behavioral, and Cognitive Components of Attitude. Ostrom, Thomas M. J Exp Soc Psychol, 15, 1, , 69 Jan.

  • 3 Components of Attitudes

It is the opinion or belief segment of an attitude. It refers that part of attitude which is related in general knowledge of a person. Affective Component Affective component is the emotional or feeling segment of an attitude. It is related to the statement which affects another person. It deals with feelings or emotions that are brought to the surface about something, such as fear or hate.

Attitudes and Behavior | Simply Psychology

Using the above example, someone might have the attitude that they love all babies because they are cute or that they hate smoking because it is harmful to health. It refers to that part of attitude which reflects the intention of a person in short run or long run. Conclusion Attitude is composed of three components, which include a cognitive component, effective or emotional component, and behavioral component.

relationship between the affective behavioral and cognitive components of attitude

Basically, the cognitive component is based on the information or knowledge, whereas the affective component is based on the feelings. The behavioral component reflects how the attitude affects the way we act or behave. It is helpful in understanding their complexity and the potential relationship between attitudes and behavior.

Social Cognition: Structure of Attitudes

As a consequence, the attitude will have a very strong influence upon a person's behavior. By contrast, an attitude will not be important to a person if it does not relate in any way to their life. The knowledge aspect of attitude strength covers how much a person knows about the attitude object.

People are generally more knowledgeable about topics that interest them and are likely to hold strong attitudes positive or negative as a consequence. Attitudes based on direct experience are more strongly held and influence behavior more than attitudes formed indirectly for example, through hear-say, reading or watching television.

relationship between the affective behavioral and cognitive components of attitude

The Function of Attitudes Attitudes can serve functions for the individual. Daniel Katz outlines four functional areas: Knowledge Attitudes provide meaning knowledge for life.

The knowledge function refers to our need for a world which is consistent and relatively stable.

relationship between the affective behavioral and cognitive components of attitude

This allows us to predict what is likely to happen, and so gives us a sense of control. Attitudes can help us organize and structure our experience.

Attitudes and Behavior

For example, knowing that a person is religious we can predict they will go to Church. Self-expression of attitudes can be non-verbal too: Therefore, our attitudes are part of our identify, and help us to be aware through the expression of our feelings, beliefs and values.

For example, when people flatter their bosses or instructors and believe it or keep silent if they think an attitude is unpopular. Again, expression can be nonverbal [think politician kissing baby].

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Attitudes then, are to do with being apart of a social group and the adaptive functions helps us fit in with a social group. People seek out others who share their attitudes, and develop similar attitudes to those they like.

relationship between the affective behavioral and cognitive components of attitude

Ego-defensive The ego-defensive function refers to holding attitudes that protect our self-esteem or that justify actions that make us feel guilty.

For example, one way children might defend themselves against the feelings of humiliation they have experienced in P.